Here's a couple pics of the completed guitar!
 
 
Finally finished this guitar!  Here's a quick rundown of the repairs I did.  I removed the neck, corrected the neck angle, installed a new bridge, reinstalled the neck, made a new bone saddle and bone nut, installed new bridge pins, and setup with some 12-54 strings.  The frets were in decent shape so I didn't level them, just buffed them with steel wool to clean them up.  The guitar sounds and plays good!  Below are some pictures of my bridge clamping method, some closeups of the repairs, and of the complete guitar!
 
 
I decided to start on this project by removing the neck.  This guitar has a bolt-on neck, held to the body with two large bolts.  I removed the bolts, and had to loosen the fretboard from the top of the guitar.
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I used some heat (placed a pot full of boiling water on the fretboard for a while) and then separated the joint using a sharp box cutter knife.  The neck came off quite nice, with the exception of one chip out of the bottom side of the fretboard which I glued back in place.  One fret was also loose, so I'll have to superglue it in place when I put the guitar back together.

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The bridge was lifting, so it had to be removed.  It seemed to be quite easy to pry up, even without heat.  A couple quick hits with a chisel pulled the whole bridge right off!

I can see why the bridge started lifting though.  The bridge and top of the guitar should have wood to wood contact when they are glued, but you can clearly see in the picture that the edge of the bridge was glued to some of the finish.  No doubt this contributed to the bridge lifting.  I bought a new rosewood bridge on Ebay, so when that comes I'll make sure this surface is properly prepped before gluing the new bridge!

 
 
This is the other guitar I got from a woman who responded to my classified ad for unwanted guitars.  Its an Art & Lutherie Wild Cherry cutaway acoustic, made in Quebec.  Its not in terible condition, but does require some attention.  For example, the neck angle looks a bit off, but that could be partly due to the bridge which is lifting.  The guitar also needs to have the nut reglued, along with a fret dress.  After all that, I think it will be a decent playable guitar!  My goal will be to fix it up, and if I can make a couple dollars on it, I can put the money back into my luthier hobby!
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